A hobbit-hole in my backyard? It may sound crazy, but I can tell you that my kids are ecstatic about it. When it is finished, it will be the coolest playhouse ever. Plus, they can enjoy the grassy hill for sledding in winter and water sliding in summer. This was all my wife's idea. She dreamt it, and now I get to be the one to bring it to reality. I'm not a construction expert; this is a total do-it-yourself job by a complete amateur. So far, though, it is turning out rather nicely, I think. Here is a step by step account of the building so far.

Since this is in blog format, the posts are in order from newest to oldest. To read this in chronological order, start with How it all Began and use the "Newer Post" links. Or click on the links under Blog Archive, in order.
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Saturday, October 10, 2009

Photos of the Back Wall

Finally, I have some new pictures to share. I have been stingy with pictures this year, because I have been doing more deconstructing than building--until now. Unfortunately, my camera is at the shop, so these are taken from my phone.

I must say, I am rather proud of how this wall has turned out. The first two pictures show it in its nearly final form, from a couple of angles. Some of the clear caulk is still drying, and I have a couple of small gaps still to fill, but it is 95% there.


Below is how the wall looked just after removing the concrete form. The window frame was unfinished and the wall was very rough with large gaps and pock marks all over. Using a product called Cement All, I was able to not only fill in the gaps and blemishes, but give the whole wall a stuccoed look that you see in the pictures above.

Here is the wall before I removed the form.
I was able to re-use almost all of the wood from the previous incarnation of the wall to build the form. The form itself was probably harder than anything else to build. It was quite tricky trying to figure out how to do it in such away that would result in an attractive wall, be structurally sound, and also enable me to get the concrete poured in evenly. I had to pour and build the form as I went up. It was actually done in two pours, the first up to about 3 inches above the cinder-block wall, and then the rest a couple of weeks later--this past weekend in fact. The last pour was in two stages while the cement was still wet. First, I poured up to about the height of the window, with the upper part of the form removed. Then I hurried and build the upper part of the form and kept pouring--building the form as I went up, until I poured the last bit through a square hole at the top of the form.


5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Looks great! So glad you didn't throw in the TNT, but can understand your temptation! Keep at it!

Bobi said...

I can only say ... WOW!!!!!!!!!! Good job! Can I be adopted? :)

Bilbo said...

looks good ive been following this for sevral months and when the posts stoped in july i was worried youd lost faith and wed never see the final product

Possibly Joe said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Possibly Joe said...

Kudos for building it so quickly. It took me five years to build mine. And yours is definitely more genuine in ways that aren't as easily down here in Arizona.

Originally I was going use your pipe technique, which certainly would have made it cheaper and faster. But I went with a concrete foundation, ferro-cement and lightweight concrete. This was only possible because my dad ran a concrete business.

Yours looks fantastic. I'm actually jealous!